Reviews of Reproduction
HOME HELP FEEDBACK SUBSCRIPTIONS ARCHIVE SEARCH TABLE OF CONTENTS  

Reviews of Reproduction (2000) 5 99-104
© 2000 Society for Reproduction and Fertility
DOI: 10.1530/ror.0.0050099
This Article
Right arrow Full Text (PDF)
Right arrow Alert me when this article is cited
Right arrow Alert me if a correction is posted
Services
Right arrow Similar articles in this journal
Right arrow Similar articles in PubMed
Right arrow Alert me to new issues of the journal
Right arrow Download to citation manager
Right arrow Permissions information
Citing Articles
Right arrow Citing Articles via HighWire
Right arrow Citing Articles via Google Scholar
Google Scholar
Right arrow Articles by Risbridger, G.
Right arrow Articles by Cancilla, B
Right arrow Search for Related Content
PubMed
Right arrow PubMed Citation
Right arrow Articles by Risbridger, G.
Right arrow Articles by Cancilla, B
Social Bookmarking
 Add to CiteULike   Add to Complore   Add to Connotea   Add to Delicious   Add to Digg   Add to Facebook   Add to LinkedIn   Add to Reddit   Add to Technorati   Add to Twitter  
What's this?

Articles

Role of activins in the male reproductive tract

GP Risbridger and B Cancilla

The search for gonadal proteins that regulate pituitary FSH led to the isolation of inhibins and activins. As members of the transforming growth factor beta (TGFbeta) superfamily of growth and differentiation factors, these proteins have been shown subsequently to affect a range of tissues and systems beyond their role in reproduction. Studies on the expression and synthesis of activins in the male reproductive tract have localized these proteins in the testis, epididymis and prostate. In general, activins regulate cell proliferation and, consequently, the expression and localization of activin subunit mRNAs and proteins within these organs must be discrete. Activin ligand bioactivity is dependent on the presence of the appropriate receptors and signalling systems, but activin ligand formation or access to receptors is regulated by the formation of inhibins or by activin-binding proteins such as follistatin. This review examines the evidence that the capacity to synthesize activins and to regulate activin bioactivity resides in the cells of the male reproductive tract. It is concluded that activins exert their effects through local (autocrine or paracrine) mechanisms, rather than through endocrine systems. The interplay between the inhibins or follistatins provides a degree of regulation of activin bioactivity before ligand signalling events. The challenge for the future is to determine whether there is any difference between the action of individual activin ligands or whether these proteins are functionally redundant, indicating that compensatory mechanisms are essential for male reproductive tract function.
Add to CiteULike CiteULike   Add to Complore Complore   Add to Connotea Connotea   Add to Delicious Delicious   Add to Digg Digg   Add to Facebook Facebook   Add to LinkedIn LinkedIn   Add to Reddit Reddit   Add to Technorati Technorati   Add to Twitter Twitter    What's this?


This article has been cited by other articles:


Home page
Biol. Reprod.Home page
H. T. Wan, Y. G. Zhao, M. H. Wong, K. F. Lee, W. S. B. Yeung, J. P. Giesy, and C. K. C. Wong
Testicular Signaling Is the Potential Target of Perfluorooctanesulfonate-Mediated Subfertility in Male Mice
Biol Reprod, May 1, 2011; 84(5): 1016 - 1023.
[Abstract] [Full Text] [PDF]


Home page
Biol. Reprod.Home page
K. M. Jervis and B. Robaire
Dynamic Changes in Gene Expression along the Rat Epididymis
Biol Reprod, September 1, 2001; 65(3): 696 - 703.
[Abstract] [Full Text] [PDF]




HOME HELP FEEDBACK SUBSCRIPTIONS ARCHIVE SEARCH TABLE OF CONTENTS  
Copyright © 2000 by the Society for Reproduction and Fertility.